Four more cargo ships leave Ukraine

Four more ships carrying Ukrainian agricultural cargo sailed from Ukrainian Black Sea ports on Sunday (7 August) as part of a deal to unblock the country’s sea exports, Ukrainian and Turkish officials said.

The four bulk carriers were loaded with almost 170,000 tonnes of corn and other foodstuffs, Ukraine’s sea ports authority said on Facebook.

The sailings follow the launch last month by Lloyd’s of a marine cargo and war insurance facility which will provide coverage for vital grain and food products transitioning through safe corridors established by the newly signed Black Sea Treaty between Russia and Ukraine.

Placed by Marsh, and led by Ascot, the Lloyd’s facility will provide up to $50 million in all risks marine cargo and war coverage. The facility will allow ships transporting grain, and other designated food products from Ukrainian ports, to have reliable and readily available coverage in place for their export voyages.

The prospective launch of the facility was first flagged by Emerging Risks.

The resumption of grain exports is being overseen by a Joint Coordination Centre (JCC) in Istanbul where Russian, Ukrainian, Turkish and UN personnel are working.

The ships that have left Ukrainian ports included Glory, with a cargo of 66,000 tonnes of corn bound for Istanbul, and Riva Wind, loaded with 44,000 tonnes of corn, heading for Turkey’s Iskenderun, the Turkish defence ministry said.

The other two vessels to have left Ukraine were Star Helena, with a cargo of 45,000 tonnes of meal heading to China, and Mustafa Necati, carrying 6,000 tonnes of sunflower oil and heading for Italy.

The United Nations and Turkey brokered the deal last month after UN warnings of possible outbreaks of famine in parts of the world due to a halt in grain shipments from Ukraine that had squeezed supplies and sent prices soaring.

On Saturday (6 August), a foreign-flagged ship arrived in Ukraine for the first time since the war started in February to be loaded with grain, Infrastructure Minister Oleksandr Kubrakov said.

Before Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Russia and Ukraine together accounted for nearly a third of global wheat exports. 

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