Canada gives green light to $6 billion green hydrogen facility

EverWind Fuels claims to have become the first green hydrogen producer in North America to secure the necessary permits for a commercial-scale facility.

EverWind expects the project’s first phase, producing and exporting 200,000 tonnes per annum, to be online in 2025, before increasing to 1 million tonnes per annum the following year. 

Authorities in Canada have granted environmental approval for EverWind to begin converting a former oil storage facility and marine terminal at Point Tupper in Nova Scotia into a green hydrogen and ammonia production hub.

While green hydrogen is currently more expensive to produce than hydrogen from fossil fuels, the cost is expected to decline as the electrolysis technology develops.

The company has agreements with German energy firms E. and Uniper to buy the product.

The green hydrogen produced by EverWind’s facility will be combined with nitrogen and converted into ammonia before being shipped, in liquid form, in tankers to Germany, where it can be retained as ammonia or turned back into green hydrogen.

Production during the facility’s first phase will be powered using wind and solar assets to be built nearby.

The company has leased 137,000 acres (55,440 hectares) which will eventually site turbines generating 2 gigawatts of wind energy, 

The overall cost of the project is expected to be around $6 billion. 

The project will also benefit from tax credits the Canadian government announced last November to support investments in renewable energy, including hydrogen.

Seperately, Los Angeles will convert its largest gas-fired power plant to one operating with green hydrogen, according to the LA Times, citing a unanimous vote by the LA City Council.

The conversion will involve installing new turbines at the Scattergood Generating Station, which will be operated with hydrogen. The hydrogen will be produced through electrolysis using power from solar or wind power installations. The report notes that green hydrogen power generation has never been done on such a scale.

The plant will not begin burning only green hydrogen from the start. At first, it would only add the low-carbon fuel to natural gas, the report noted.

The unanimous vote by the City Council comes after its own Energy and Environment Committee expressed some concern about the project and made certain recommendations prompted by criticism from different groups, including environmentalists.

Los Angeles will convert the Scattergood Generating Station, its largest gas-fired power plant to one operating with green hydrogen, according to the LA Times, citing a unanimous vote by the LA City Council.

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